Steve Eggleston Writes

Politics

One hundred years after women first gained the right to sit in Parliament as MPs, the Speaker’s Advisory Committee on Works of Art will host the ‘209 Women’ exhibition from 14 December 2018 to 14 February 2019.   Unveiled in time for the anniversary of the first election where some women could cast a vote, the exhibition includes portraits of female MPs, all photographed by female photographers in an all-female initiative.

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Zero Carbon Britain is the flagship research project from the Centre for Alternative Technology, showing that a modern, zero-emissions society is possible using technology available today.

To find out more and get involved visit www.zerocarbonbritain.org

Monsanto lobbyists were officially barred by the European Parliament on Thursday after refusing requests to participate in hearings about the U.S. corporation’s efforts to influence regulations of its controversial glyphosate within the 28-nation bloc.

The ban was announced by the parliament’s presidential council under rules designed to combat misbehavior by those lobbying the EU’s lawmaking body. It is the first time, the Guardian noted, that “MEPs have used new rules to withdraw parliamentary access for firms that ignore a summons to attend parliamentary inquiries or hearings.”

Source: Jon Queally Ecowatch

https://www.ecowatch.com/eu-parliament-monsanto-lobbyists-2490626188.html

A brief animated introduction to localization.

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Across the world, people are coming to realize that today’s crises — ecological collapse, economic instability, social disintegration, even terrorism — are inextricably linked to a global economy dependent on rampant consumerism, financial speculation and “free” trade.
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The Paris Agreement will leave activists demanding direct action on fossil fuels and energy market reform, says Sydney University research associate Rebecca Pearse.

A global climate agreement was adopted in Paris on Saturday evening, but it will leave activists demanding direct action on fossil fuels and energy market reform.

Before the Paris talks even began there were activists arguing that the negotiations would not deliver what they want. The Climate Justice Action network said that the COP21 will continue a 20 years of ineffective climate policy, demonstrated by a 65 per cent rise in fossil fuel emissions since 1990.

Meanwhile, Saturday’s protests were about saying campaigns for climate justice will continue.

Has activist pessimism about the agreement been justified?

The Paris Agreement doesn’t stack up

Klein argues that there is some “good language” in the agreement. The Paris text recognises the need to cap temperature rises at 1.5℃. However, the language doesn’t match national pledges for action. These pledges are so weak that a dangerous 3 or 4 degrees warming is likely.
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Public canteens were set up to feed people during World War One – and they proved hugely popular. Could today’s food banks learn from them, asks Adam Forrest.

A bowl of soup, a joint of meat and a portion of side vegetables cost 6d – just over £1 in today’s money. Puddings, scones and cakes could be bought for as little as 1d (about 18p).

These self-service restaurants, run by local workers and partly funded by government grants, offered simple meals at subsidised prices.
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Women and men experience conflict in different ways and therefore understand peace in different ways.

The world is continuing to hear about the desperate situation of many women in conflict zones, in refugee camps and in societies which continue to exclude women and girls from everyday life outside the home. In conflict zones, women and girls are vulnerable to sexual slavery, rape and other forms of gender-based violence, with little prospect of escape. Women are also disproportionately represented in the world’s refugee population, which, for women refugees is compounded by the vulnerability of being female in addition to losing statehood and access to critical healthcare and education.
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The UN’s International Court of Justice (ICJ) has ruled that the Japanese government must halt its whaling programme in the Antarctic.

It agreed with Australia, which brought the case in May 2010, that the programme was not for scientific research as claimed by Tokyo.

Japan said it would abide by the decision but added it “regrets and is deeply disappointed by the decision”.

Australia argued that the programme was commercial whaling in disguise.

The court’s decision is considered legally binding.
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Today the world remembers the victims of the Rwandan genocide, and recognises the inspirational reconciliation process that has drawn a country out of darkness and towards a bright future.

The genocide that devastated Rwanda in 1994 is one of history’s darkest moments, with around 10,000 people killed each day for over three months. This week marks 20 years since the “100 Days of Genocide,” which was ignited when then President Juvenal Habyarimana’s plane was shot down in the capital Kigali on the 6th of April. Over 100 days around 800,000 people were slaughter by Hutu extremists. While the main targets were members of the minority Tutsi community, political opponents and so called “sympathetic Hutus” were also targeted.
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India has stepped up forest conservation efforts in recent years, with a major project underway to establish a large swath of uninterrupted habitat through the designation of additional protected areas and expanding those already under protection. If realized, these areas would converge to become Asia’s largest unbroken protected forest, encompassing approximately 15,000 square kilometers (5,790 square miles) over three states.

The southwest state of Karnataka is leading efforts, declaring protections for nearly 2,600 square kilometers (1,000 square miles) of forest since 2012. In addition, Karnataka has worked with adjoining states Tamil Nadu and Kerala to connect 8,766 square kilometers (3,386 square miles) of previously protected areas.
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First Lady Michelle Obama is in China this week to focus on education and culture.

Students at Beijing Normal School eagerly greeted First Lady Michelle Obama on Friday. Many children here dream of attending universities abroad, and one of the school’s aims is to help them achieve that dream. Obama’s focus on education for this trip is an example of soft diplomacy – attracting Chinese interest in one of the United States’ greatest assets.

“They recognize the sort of innovative vitality of the U.S. educational system,” said Elizabeth Economy, Asia director for the Council on Foreign Relations. “It’s a very creative system, and one that has produced legions of very successful entrepreneurs and thinkers.”
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Finance heads from the 20 largest economies have wrapped up a two-day conference in Sydney, Australia with an agreement to implement policies that will boost world GDP (Gross Domestic Product) by two percent over five years.

An unusually brief two-page statement issued Sunday vowed to drive a return to strong, sustainable and balanced growth in the global economy.

However, the statement also expressed “deep regret” that International Monetary Fund reforms to give more say to emerging market economies had been blocked by the U.S. Congress.
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